The Venus de Medici (right) Both of these female nudes illustrate the Classic pose known as the Venus Pudica, or Modest Venus, as it appears she is trying to cover her breasts and genitals with her hands. Venus pudica. Different versions of Venus pudica. A Medici-Venus Praxitelész knidoszi Aphrodité-szobrának egyik változata után (i. e. 3. század), i. e. 1. századi athéni szobrász által készített római másolat, márványból készült, magassága 1,53 méter. Venus Pudica. Venus pudica. The goddess stands upright on a shell as she is driven towards the shore by the breeze of Zephyrus, a wind god, who is holding the nymph, Chloris. "Venus pudica" is a term used to describe a classic figural pose in Western art. The term describes a classical sculpture type where Venus is surprised at her bath and covers her nudity with her arms.

“Venus Pudica Power: The Evolution and Reclamation of the Female Nude” In the fifth chapter of Cynthia Freeland’s work, But is it art?, the world of feminist art is briefly explored, with special attention paid to the ‘Guerilla Girls’, a group of female artists who … Maurizio Nicosia | ABA Bologna, ABA Ravenna. A nearly identical statuette (in the Basel Historisches Museum, Switzerland) was owned by the collector Basilius Amerbach (1533-91), who believed the statuette to be ancient.

It is a first century BCE marble copy, perhaps made in Athens, of a bronze original Greek sculpture, following the type of the Aphrodite of Cnidos, which would have been made by a sculptor in the immediate Praxitelean tradition, perhaps at the end of the century.

In the search for naturalism they were aided by the anatomical discoveries of sculptors and by the new laws of perspective that had been formulated by Brunelleschi. The Venus de' Medici or Medici Venus is a lifesize Hellenistic marble sculpture depicting Aphrodite in a Venus pudica pose. (She is a modest lass, this Venus.) The aim of painters in the early and mid-fifteenth century was truthfulness to nature rather than a conscious imitation of classical styles. The resultant pose - which is not, incidentally, applicable to the male nude - is somewhat asymmetrical and often serves to draw one's eye to the very spot being hidden. In his Venus and Anchises on the Farnese ceiling (c. 1597-1600; Rome, Palazzo Farnese), Annibale Carracci used the pose to denote Venus' hesitation on whether to give in … Marble statue of Venus, 100/150, From the collection of: British Museum. Other artists in the 16th c. CE offer similar variations of the venus pudica, as in Giorgione’s Sleeping Venus and Titian’s Venus of Urbino.

It is a first century BCE marble copy, perhaps made in Athens, of a bronze original Greek sculpture, following the type of the Aphrodite of Cnidos , which would have been made by a sculptor in the immediate Praxitelean tradition, perhaps at the end of the century. Her gesture implies awareness of an unexpected gaze: the viewer's. In this, an unclothed female (either standing or reclining) keeps one hand covering her private parts. Interpretation  Venus Pudica In English, modest Venus. This Venus, with her legs close together and a hand covering her genital area, is a "Venus Pudica," modest or chaste Venus. Marble statue of naked Venus (Uffizi, Florence), first recorded for certain in 1638 in the Villa Medici in Rome. Marble statue of Venus, 100/150, From the collection of: British Museum. The Venus de' Medici or Medici Venus is a lifesize Hellenistic marble sculpture depicting Aphrodite in a Venus pudica pose. Examples of this kind were known in the Renaissance, including a Roman copy in the Medici collection, now in the Uffizi, Florence. Maurizio Nicosia | ABA Bologna, ABA Ravenna. The Venus of the Uffizi is of the “Venus pudica” type, whose right breast is covered by her right hand and billowing long blond hair partially shrouds her body.

These works and others ushered in the trend of the ‘Reclining Venus’, which maintains almost all of the features of the venus pudica while portraying the …